Saddle Cloth, Believed to be of Tipu Sultan of Mysore

Saddle cloth from India, allegedly belonging to Tipu Sultan of Mysore, defeated by the British in AD 1799. Saddle cloth from India, allegedly belonging to Tipu Sultan of Mysore, defeated by the British in AD 1799. Courtesy Victoria and Albert Museum, acc. no. 784-1864.

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London houses a saddle cloth from the Deccan in India, which is believed to have belonged to Tipu Sultan of Mysore, who was defeated by the British in AD 1799 at the Battle of Seringapatam (Srirangapatna). The saddle cloth is 143.5 cm high and 142.2 cm wide. It is made of a velvet ground material embroidered with silver gilt thread, with wire and with sequins.

It was bought by the Museum (at the time called the South Kensington Museum) in 1864 as : "Saddle cloth of crimson Genoa velvet thickly embroidered with gold thread in conventional foliage pattern, &c. Indian, formerly the property of Tippoo Sahib. Received from Stores 15 July 1864. Received from Mrs Williamson. Price £30.00."

See also the quilted helmet, recently auctioned at Bonhams (2015), and reputedly originating from Tipu Sultan's armoury. See also the quiver, arm guards and belt, reputedly from the same armoury as the quilted helmet.

V&A online catalogue (retrieved 18 December 2016)

WV

Last modified on Tuesday, 20 December 2016 18:38