Print this page

Pelerine

Pelerine made of muslin with whitework embroidery. UK, early 19th century Pelerine made of muslin with whitework embroidery. UK, early 19th century Copyright Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK, acc. no. T.114-1973.

In mid-nineteenth century England, the term pelerine referred to a waist-length cape that was often made of embroidered muslin, lace or net. In Germany and the Netherlands, a pelerine nowadays refers to a short cape that can be made of any material and was (is) used for both indoor and outdoor wear.

The term pelerine derives from the Italian word pellegrini and the cloak (pellegrina) worn by Christian pilgrims. Nowadays the term pellegrina (see wikipedia) is also widely used for an ecclesiastical garment in the form of a short, elbow length cape that is open at the front (the version that is closed is called a mozzetta). Compare the pope's pellegrina, which is also worn by British Catholic clergy.

See also the TRC Needles entry on a tippet.

Source: Shorter Oxford English Dictionary: ‘Pelerine’.

V&A online catalogue (retrieved 9th July 2016).

GVE

Last modified on Wednesday, 24 May 2017 16:42