Afghan Dress

Velvet!

This online exhibition is based on a TRC Gallery Exhibition with the title VELVET!, presented at the Textile Research Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands, from 22nd January until 28th June 2019. 

 

For this online exhibition:

  • Author: Gillian Vogelsang-Eastwood
  • Web-design: Joost Koopman
  • Exhibition design: Willem Vogelsang
  • Publisher: TRC Leiden.
  • Year of publication: 2018
  • Copyright: All illustrations of objects housed in the TRC collection can be used free of charge, but please add to the caption: "Courtesy Textile Research Centre, Leiden" and the pertinent accession number of the object.

Velvet! A luxurious textile in the spotlight

Soft, smooth, silky – these are just some of the terms conjured up by the word VELVET, but velvet is much more that soft and silky, and often it is…

A brief history of velvet

The creation of a series of loops (a pile) while making a textile is not a new idea. The ancient Egyptians created piled linen textiles as early as the Middle…

Raw materials

An essential feature in the production of velvet is the range of raw materials that are being used. Over the centuries these have changed dramatically. Not surprisingly, the late eighteenth…

The production of velvet

Currently there are three main ways in which warp-based (‘proper’) velvet can be made. Two forms use looms, the third a form of knitting frame. Velvets made on a loom…

The main types of velvet

These are various ways in which velvet can produce different effects, such as changing the type of fibre or thread used, varying the colour of the pile, using cut and…

Classic velvet designs

Up until the 15th century, designs on Italian velvets tended to be small and were regarded as suitable for any type of silk designs including velvets. Velvet weavers, for example,…

Clothing and velvets

Caps, hats, bonnets, shawls, dresses, cloaks and capes, coats, jackets, skirts and trousers have all been made in velvet. Some garments, such as the 10 m long velvet skirts worn…

Furnishing velvets

Furnishing velvets are velvets that are used around a building, either in public or private circumstances. These textiles can be divided into two basic forms, soft-furnishings, such as curtains and…

Some alternative velvets

There are various forms of textiles that are superficially related to velvet. These include warp and weft-piled weaves, as well as glued forms. The most common are: Chenille Chenille is…

Kuba or Kasai 'velvet'

Kuba or Kasai ‘velvet’ is a form of textile that is produced in Congo. Although the textiles are often referred to as velvets or pile weaves, they are in fact…