Looping

Looping

A bobble is very similar to a pompom, but generally somewhat smaller. WV

 

 

The chain is the name sometimes used for one of the basic stitches in tatting. It is made of a series of double stitches along one line. In crochet it is the series of loops that constitute the basis of a piece of crochet.

A chain ring is a length of crochet chain that is made into a ring by linking the ends of the chain using a slip stitch.

Knitting is a method by which yarn is used to create a looped fabric. The earliest recorded English usage of the word ‘knitting’ dates from 1598. Technically, knitting is not a form of decorative needlework, as a sewing needle is not used in its production. Nevertheless, it often features in publications about needlework.

Nålebinding is a looping technique used to produce a textile with a nålebinding needle and a thread. The technique involves passing the full length of the thread through each loop using a flat needle. The lengths of thread are pieced together during the working process. There are different ways of working the loops.

Pearl is a term that is used for a row of fine loops forming a decorative edging on pillow lace, braid, ribbon, gold lace and so forth.

The basic structure of a pompom (also known as pompon, from French pompon) is made by winding a length of thread around a card template, removing the looped threads from the card, and then binding them tightly around the middle. The looped ends on both sides are subsequently cut through and then manipulated into the desired shape.

The collection of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam includes a photograph, taken in the early twentieth century, of a woman sitting at a table and doing crochet. The photograph was part of a family album with photographs of wine seller Kraaij & Co.(Bordeaux - Amsterdam). The table is covered with a cloth made of tape lace.