Appliqué

Appliqué

Appliqué is a needlework technique, whereby a piece of cloth or other material is laid on top of another, normally larger piece and the two are stitched together, often to create a decorative effect. Such a combined piece of cloth may in its turn be stitched on top of another.

Gota work, or gotapatti, is an Indian embroidery technique that originated in Rajasthan, Western India, where it is still being produced. Basically, gota work is an appliqué technique that fastens silver or gold (coloured) ribbons (gota) onto the ground material, with the edges of the ribbon sewn down, thus creating elaborate designs. Garments decorated with Gota work are used all over South Asia for wedding ceremonies and other festive occasions. 

Opus consutum is mentioned in thirteenth century documents and may be translated as 'sewn-together work'. It would refer to intarsia or inlaid appliqué. The term is again used from the late-nineteenth century for appliqué work, especially from the medieval period. The word is first attested by the Roman Catholic priest and ecclesiast, Daniel Rock (1799-1871).

Reverse appliqué is a needlework technique whereby several layers of cloth are placed on top of each other and shapes are cut out in layers of decreasing size. Some of the most famous reverse appliqués are the molas from Panama, worked by Kuna Indian women.